Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse Recipe

Looking for a refreshing and tart beer to enjoy during the summer months? Look no further than this Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse recipe! With its combination of fruity raspberries and tangy lactobacillus, this modern take on a traditional German style is sure to quench your thirst on even the hottest of days. Follow these instructions and you’ll be sipping on a pint of your own homemade Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse in just a few short weeks.

Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse

Tart and super refreshing, this is a modern take on a traditional German style that originates from Berlin. After pitching the lactobacillus, be sure to wait 24 hours before pitching the yeast.
Prep Time1 hour
Cook Time1 hour 15 minutes
To Ferment28 days
Course: Beer
Cuisine: wheat beers
Keyword: Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse
Servings: 40 Pints
Calories: 153kcal
Author: Dan Smullen

Equipment

  • 1 Large brew kettle
  • 1 Mash tun
  • 1 Heat source (such as a propane burner or electric stove)
  • 1 Immersion or counterflow wort chiller
  • 1 Fermenter (such as a glass carboy or plastic bucket)
  • 1 Airlock and stopper
  • 1 Auto-siphon
  • 1 Hydrometer
  • 1 Thermometer
  • 1 Brewing spoon or paddle
  • 1 pH meter or pH strips (optional)
  • 1 Sanitizer (such as Star San or iodophor)
  • 1 Bottling bucket or kegging equipment (if desired)
  • 1 Bottles or kegs

Ingredients

For the Mash – Liquor 9.5 Litres (16 Pints) – Mash Time 1 hr – Temperature 67°c/153 °F

  • lb Pilsner Malt Quantity 2.5 kg
  • lb Wheat Malt Quantity 1.25kg

For the Boil – 27 Litres (47½ Pints) – Boil Time 1 hr – 15 mins

  • 1 tsp Protofloc Other – When to add – For last 15 mins of boil

To Ferment – 35°C (95°F) – Conditioning 2 weeks at 10°C (50°F)

  • 1 White Labs WLP672 When to add – At start of fermentation
  • 1 Lactobacillus Brevis
  • 1 Reduce to 20°C (68°F)
  • 1 before pitching the yeast
  • 1 Yeast Bay Sigmund's Voss Kveik Yeast – When to add – After 1 day of fermentation
  • 1 Brettanomyces claussenii Yeast – When to add – After 1 day of fermentation
  • oz (Hops) Mosaic 12% When to add – After 4 days of fermentation, leave for about a week
  • lb Raspberries, frozen Other – When to add – After fermentation

Instructions

  • Begin by heating up 9.5 liters (16 pints) of water to a temperature of 67°C (153°F) in a large pot or mash tun.
  • Once the water is at the correct temperature, add 5½ pounds (2.5 kilograms) of Pilsner malt and 2¾ pounds (1.25 kilograms) of wheat malt to the water. Stir the grains until they are fully submerged and ensure there are no clumps.
  • Allow the mash to sit for 1 hour, maintaining a temperature of 67°C (153°F) throughout the duration.
  • After 1 hour, heat up 27 liters (47½ pints) of water to a boil in a separate pot or kettle.
  • Once the water is boiling, add 1 teaspoon of Protofloc to the pot. Allow the Protofloc to boil for the last 15 minutes of the boil.
  • Once the mash is complete, strain it into the boiling pot, stirring well to ensure that everything is fully mixed.
  • Bring the pot to a boil and boil for 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  • After 1 hour and 15 minutes, turn off the heat and allow the pot to cool down to 35°C (95°F).
  • Once the pot has cooled, add 1 White Labs WLP672 yeast to the pot and stir well. Allow the pot to sit for 24 hours.
  • After 24 hours, add 1 Lactobacillus Brevis to the pot, and reduce the temperature to 20°C (68°F).
  • Wait another 24 hours before adding 1 Yeast Bay Sigmund's Voss Kveik Yeast and 1 Brettanomyces claussenii Yeast to the pot.
  • After 4 days of fermentation, add 3½ ounces (100 grams) of Mosaic hops to the pot and leave them in for about a week.
  • Once the fermentation is complete, add 2¼ pounds (1 kilogram) of frozen raspberries to the pot.
  • Allow the pot to sit for 2
Makes 🍻Ready to Drink 🍺Estimated ABVBitterness RatingColor Rating
23 Litres (40 Pints)3 Weeks3.7%IBU5.6 EBC

Unique Twist on a Classic Style

This Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse recipe offers a unique twist on the traditional German beer style. With the addition of raspberries and Mosaic hops, this beer has a fruity and refreshing taste that sets it apart from other wheat beers.

Perfect for Summer Sipping

With its tart and tangy flavor profile, this Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse is the perfect beer for summer sipping. Its light and crisp body makes it a great choice for hot summer days and outdoor gatherings with friends and family.

Easy to Make at Home

Don’t be intimidated by the idea of brewing your own beer – this Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse recipe is easy to follow and requires only a few basic pieces of equipment. With a little bit of patience and a willingness to experiment, you’ll be able to brew your own delicious and unique beer at home.

FAQ on Making this Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse Recipe

What is a Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse?

A Raspberry Mosaic Berliner Weisse is a tart and refreshing beer that is a modern take on a traditional German style that originates from Berlin. It is made with raspberries, Mosaic hops, lactobacillus, and various yeasts.

What ingredients are needed to make this beer?

The ingredients needed to make this beer include Pilsner malt, wheat malt, Mosaic hops, frozen raspberries, lactobacillus, White Labs WLP672 yeast, Sigmund’s Voss Kveik yeast, and Brettanomyces claussenii yeast.

How long does it take to ferment this beer?

This beer takes 28 days to ferment, with an additional 2 weeks of conditioning.

What type of equipment is needed to make this beer?

Equipment needed to make this beer includes a mash tun, brew kettle, fermentation vessel, airlock, thermometer, hydrometer, and bottling equipment.

What is the ideal serving temperature for this beer?

This beer is best served at a temperature of 10-12°C (50-54°F).

How does the addition of raspberries affect the taste of the beer?

The addition of raspberries gives the beer a fruity and slightly sweet flavor that balances out the tartness of the lactobacillus.

What is the difference between a Berliner Weisse and a traditional wheat beer?

Berliner Weisse is a sour wheat beer that is typically lower in alcohol content than traditional wheat beers. It is also often served with a flavored syrup to balance out the sourness.

Can the recipe be modified to increase or decrease the alcohol content?

The recipe can be modified by adjusting the amount of malt used to increase or decrease the alcohol content.

What food pairings would complement this beer?

This beer pairs well with light salads, seafood, and spicy dishes. It also pairs well with cheeses such as brie or goat cheese.

Can fresh raspberries be used instead of frozen?

Yes, fresh raspberries can be used instead of frozen in this recipe.

Dan Smullen Beer is my life profile

Hi, I'm Dan, founder of BeerIsMyLife. I've been an avid homebrewer for over ten years, and beer is my true passion. I've traveled all over the world, visiting breweries, tasting beer, as well as making my own batches. I set up this blog to share that experience with you.